What works: Improving outcomes for children with a parent in prison

What works: Improving outcomes for children with a parent in prison cover
Date published
4 Jun 2015
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What Works

This paper presents what we know about interventions and strategies to improve outcomes for children with a parent in prison.

It also shines a light on the wide range of negative impacts that children with a parent in prison experience, including long term poor health, educational and social outcomes, and their own high risk of future imprisonment.

The point at which a parent is imprisoned can help identify children at risk, and be an opportunity to provide effective interventions.

What Works: Improving outcomes for children with a parent in prison found that interventions developed for children generally at risk are likely to be effective for children with a parent in prison. Māori children are much more likely to have a parent in prison compared to non-Māori children.

Increased government focus for this priority population group will help to address the wider context of New Zealand families with multiple complex problems.

This release illustrates the need for policy that takes a multi-agency approach to improving outcomes for children with a parent in prison.

This information is provided to help the social sector make better decisions - about funding, policies and services – to improve the lives of families and whānau.

There is also an annotated bibliography for this research.

If you have any questions or would like to discuss this research, please contact enquiries@superu.govt.nz.

Last update: 22 Sep 2015